mast_urb_sm.gif
navbar.gif
Page 7
From the New-York Daily Tribune, Saturday, March 18, 1851.
THE RUM TRAFFIC – The annexed table is compiled from the returns made to the Chief of Police.  It exhibits the number of licensed and unlicensed rum shops that existed on the first day of January in the different Watch Districts of the City, and the number of such places that are kept open on Sunday:

Patrol Districts          Lic’d    Not Lic’d     Sund.     Whole No.

First...........................372..........  65...........320.............437
Second.......................171.........    4...........  82.............175
Third..........................240.........   20..........159.............260
Fourth........................382.........   14..........380.............196
Fifth...........................212.........   12..........150.............224
Sixth..........................384......... 176...........404.............410
Seventh......................245.........   20..........250.............265
Eighth........................295.........   31..........215.............316
Ninth..........................210.........   19..........160.............229
Tenth.........................184..........   15..........180.............199
Eleventh....................300.......... 180..........200.............400
Twelfth......................185.........   30..........200.............215
Thirteenth..................150.........   20..........100.............103
Fourteenth.................216.........   46...........270.............286
Fifteenth....................137.........     4..........  95.............142
Sixteenth....................417......... 156..........550.............567
Seventeenth...............257.........   23........... 74..............230
Eighteenth.................220.........   21..........107..............241
                            _____       ____       _____         _____
Total.......................4,425         756       3,896          5,225

Here are 3,896 weekly violations of the law in the City with a police force of  600 or 800 well paid men – and with the knowledge of the fact that nearly 4,000 rum shops are open every Sunday can we wonder that the jails are filled to over flowing – that the Tombs want enlarging – and that our Alms-House cost $400,000 per year? – Our Mayor  is a good reformer, as far as he goes, but he falls short of his whole duty.  If he would but
historyasit.gif
make one descent upon these vile Sunday retailers of villainous liquors, break them up, he would receive the warm thanks of thousands.  If there is one crime that disgraces our City more than another, it is the infamous liquor traffic on the Sabbath.
_____________________________
The Municipal Police Force of Mayor F. Wood has been disbanded and the Metropolitan Police District is established by order of the New York State Legislature, and the Court of Appeals.  This sets the stage for one of the worst gang riots (on July 4, 1857) in New York history.  Next following entry is the general order issued by Mayor Fernando Wood July 3, 1857.  -  G.C.

From the  New-York Daily Tribune, Saturday, July 4, 1857.
THE POLICE DIFFICULTIES.
THE MAYOR SUCCUMBS AND DISBANDS HIS POLICE.

The Mayor, shortly after reaching his office yesterday morning ordered his men to report themselves at their respective Station-Houses and remain for further orders.  The detailed officers at the Essex Market Police Court were withdrawn, leaving the Court without any officers to serve procedures.  
He soon afterward issued the following general order, copies of which were forthwith prepared and sent to the captains of police in the various wards:

OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF POLICE
General Order, 775]      New-York, July 3, 1857.
Captain ____ _______, ____ District.
SIR: The Court of Appeals having decided in favor of the constitutionality of the Act to establish a Metropolitan Police District, it is our duty to yield to that decision, and to acknowledge the law as binding and obligatory upon our conduct.
Whatever may be the opinion of the great body of the people as to the tyranny and injustice of legislation which deprives us of the right of self-government, and however repugnant the law is to our local pride and independence, we have no present resource but compliance and submission.
So far, therefore, as the existing police organization of the city is concerned, as formed pursuant to the laws passed anterior to 1857, now repealed, we have no discretion but to abandon and dissolve it at once and forthwith.
Its official power gone, and we have no authority to continue it another hour.  You will therefore assemble your men and read to them this order, and withdraw them from all patrol or other official service.  Whether a municipal day and night watch is consistent with this decision, and whether it shall be established pursuant to the ordinance of the Common Council, approved June 2, 1857, is a matter of future determination.  I shall announce the conclusions on that subject at an early day.
You will, in the meantime, and until further orders, remain in charge of the Station-House and all the Corporation property entrusted to your care, and require the officers and men under your command to deliver up to your custody the Police property in their possessions.
By order,   FERNANDO WOOD, Mayor

As soon as this order could be received and read, stars and buttons were piled and the streets were inundated with policemen out of uniform.  Their curses of the Mayor were loud as well as deep. “G-d d-n him,” said a prominent member of the Department, “he’s been telling us this for three or four weeks  “now, that he had private word from the Judges that they would decide against the law; and that’s the way he’s kept us on his side.”   Those who two weeks ago were most determined to fight for him, and who were obliged to pawn their watches to raise the $5 which was levied to pay “Charlie O’Connor for defendin’ us,”  now that they find how they have been tricked, are most exasperated against him.  Fifteen days ago the City Hall was filled with uniforms.  Yesterday afternoon not one was worn in it.
ray ban sunglasses sale ray ban 3364 ralph lauren polo outlet polo outlet online A meeting of the Captains was called for 2’oclock yesterday afternoon.  Its purpose was said to be to countermand the orders issued to them for the Fourth of July.  However, as their occupation is now gone, even in the opinion of the Mayor himself, the folly of this was too apparent to allow the farce to be enacted.  Still, he has ordered them to protect the property of the city at the Station-Houses.  As they have been dismissed the service for some weeks past, and as the Mayor has had no legal control over them since the law went into effect, this last order is as much a usurpation of authority as that under which the heads of the Metropolitan Police were broken.
The Mayor has become responsible for the costs in the suits against him.  They will amount to about $2,500.
It was currently reported about the City hall yesterday that on Monday a caucus of the Democratic Councilmen would be held, in which a preamble and resolution would be drafted, in view of the decision of the Court of Appeals, tendering the use of the Station Houses, the telegraphic apparatus, and the office of the late Chief of Police, to the Metropolitan Police Commissioners, and that the same would be introduced into the Board of Councilmen and adopted.
nav_continue.gif
____________________